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The wonderfully odd Pink Rocks of Colorado’s Paint Mines

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In Eastern Colorado, just on the outer edge of the great plains is Calhan’s Paint Mines, a geological oddity that’s completely out of place filled with pink rocks, hoodoos, and 9,000 years of human history. Sun, wind, and erosion has turned the once clay fields of this Eastern Colorado site, into a geological spectacle. What surely was a place fo…

In Eastern Colorado, just on the outer edge of the great plains is Calhan’s Paint Mines, a geological oddity that’s completely out of place filled with pink rocks, hoodoos, and 9,000 years of human history.
Sun, wind, and erosion has turned the once clay fields of this Eastern Colorado site, into a geological spectacle. What surely was a place for early human civilization to collect clay and natural paints is now a wonderful “distraction-attraction.”
Follow along as I, your PULP360 host, Ashley Lowe, travel to the weird geological oddity known as Paint Mines in Eastern Colorado.
https://youtu.be/HFnpaEwUi1U
Where to go:
Google Maps
For more info:
WikipediaColorado Encyclopedia

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US & World

Tourism still booms in Cuba but Trump’s tougher stance hurting private entrepreneurs

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HAVANA (AP) — On a sweltering early summer afternoon in Miami’s Little Havana, President Donald Trump told a cheering Cuban-American crowd that he was rolling back some of Barack Obama’s opening to Cuba in order to starve the island’s military-run economy of U.S. tourism dollars and ratchet up pressure for regime change. That doesn’t appear to be happening. Trave…

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HAVANA (AP) — On a sweltering early summer afternoon in Miami’s Little Havana, President Donald Trump told a cheering Cuban-American crowd that he was rolling back some of Barack Obama’s opening to Cuba in order to starve the island’s military-run economy of U.S. tourism dollars and ratchet up pressure for regime change.
That doesn’t appear to be happening. Travel to Cuba is booming from dozens of countries, including the U.S. And the tourism dollars from big-spending Americans seem to be heading into Cuba’s state sector and away from private business, according to Cuban state figures, experts and private business people themselves.
The government figures show that 2017 was a record year for tourism, with 4.7 million visitors pumping more than $3 billion into the island’s otherwise struggling economy. The number of American travelers rose to 619,000, more than six times the pre-Obama level. But amid the boom — an 18 percent increase over 2016 — owners of private restaurants and bed-and-breakfasts are reporting a sharp drop-off.
“There was an explosion of tourists in the months after President Obama’s detente announcement. They were everywhere!” said Rodolfo Morales, a retired government worker who rents two rooms in his home for about $30 a night. “Since then, it’s fallen off.”
The ultimate destination of American tourism spending in Cuba seems an obscure data point, but it’s highly relevant to a decades-old goal of American foreign policy — encouraging change in Cuba’s single-party, centrally planned system. For more than 50 years, Washington sought to strangle nearly all trade with the island in hopes of spurring economic collapse. Obama changed that policy to one of promoting engagement as a way of strengthening a Cuban private sector that could grow into a middle class empowered to demand reform.
Cuba’s tourism boom began shortly after Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro announced in December 2014 that their countries would re-establish diplomatic relations and move toward normalization. U.S. cruise ships began docking in the Bay of Havana and U.S. airlines started regular flights to cities across the island. Overall tourism last year was up 56 percent over Cuba’s roughly 3 million visitors in 2014.
While the U.S. prohibits tourism to Cuba, Americans can travel here for specially designated purposes like religious activity or the vaguely defined category of “people-to-people” cultural interaction.
Obama allowed individuals to participate in “people-to-people” activities outside official tour groups. Hundreds of thousands of Americans responded by designing th…
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Breckenridge: Not Just Another Ski Town

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For most people, the name Breckenridge evokes the concept of a “ski town,” an area that was made up and commercialized to trap the unsuspecting out-of-town tourist or ski obsessed Coloradan into coming to enjoy the slopes during the winter. And while Breckenridge does boast an impressive ski resort of over 2,000 acres that first opened in the 1960s (an…

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For most people, the name Breckenridge evokes the concept of a “ski town,” an area that was made up and commercialized to trap the unsuspecting out-of-town tourist or ski obsessed Coloradan into coming to enjoy the slopes during the winter. And while Breckenridge does boast an impressive ski resort of over 2,000 acres that first opened in the 1960s (and which Vail Resorts purchased in 1996), its history is richer and much more complicated than a fancy tourism trap would make it out to be. And there is so much more to do in Breckenridge than just ski.
While this may shock those whose sole purpose is skiing nonstop during the winter, Breckenridge is a historical town that has a number of other wonderful qualities and interesting things to check out. So for anyone who has a desire to venture into the mountains during the winter but doesn’t want to spend money on skiing—or dedicate their entire trip to the activity—there are also a lot of other things to do and explore in the historical mountain town of Breckenridge, Colorado.

Breckenridge: Historical Exploration

If you’re a history buff or interested in exploring one of the oldest settled in Colorado, Breckenridge truly is an area to explore. Breckenridge was actually a mining town founded during the Colorado Gold Rush in 1859—a decade or more sooner than places like Colorado Springs or Pueblo and nearer the time of the settling of Denver in 1858. As one of the oldest towns in Colorado, it has a lot of fascinating history surrounding the area. There are numerous ghost towns and old mining shafts in the region.
Breckenridge Heritage Alliance and The Summit Historical Society are both amazing resources for navigating the entire area through the eyes of a historian. Breckenridge Heritage Alliance includes museums like the home of Barney L. Ford—a runaway slave who lived in Breckenridge and became a civil rights leader—and the Edwin Carter Museum, who was a naturalist that observed the harmful effects of mining on the environment. The Summit Historical Society has museums like the Dillon Schoolhouse Museum, an old school that has been kept in prime condition.
The Heritage Alliance also offers quite a few walking tours that range from downtown historical homes to paranormal activity hunts, and the Iowa Hill Gold Mine Hike is one of their historical hikes that is open year round. It’s always good to start at the Welcome Center in downtown Breckenridge to get up-to-date information and brochures on seasonal tours. For more history, see our Breckenridge History section.

Breckenridge: Arts & Culture

Breckenridge also has a vibrant arts & culture scene that continues to expand and grow. In 2014, Breckenridge Arts District was opened in downtown Breckenridge. The district features art studios, performance venues, art exhibits, art classes and workshops, and other fun events like yoga for people of all ages.
There is a scattering of art galleries in Breckenridge that feature local artists, including Breckenridge Gallery, which has been in business for over 30 years; Arts Alive Gallery, a co-op of …
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Travel

Wintry Things To Do in Breckenridge Colorado (That Aren’t Skiing)

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While it’s clear that Breckenridge isn’t just a ski town, it’s still a popular spot for anyone heading into the mountains during the winter. If you need some other ideas when heading to Breckenridge, here are festivals and activities to consider in this historical, mountain town this winter. Ullr FestThis festival is one of the first festivals tha…

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While it’s clear that Breckenridge isn’t just a ski town, it’s still a popular spot for anyone heading into the mountains during the winter. If you need some other ideas when heading to Breckenridge, here are festivals and activities to consider in this historical, mountain town this winter. Ullr FestThis festival is one of the first festivals that Breckenridge ever formed 55 years ago. Since a lot of the ski instructors were Norwegian at the beginning of the ski slopes in Breckenridge in the 1950s, the festival was born out of Norse myth—Ullr (pronounced “Ew-Lur”) was the Norse God of Snow—and the celebration of snow. The festival includes a parade, bonfire, and the World’s Longest Shot Ski. 2018’s Ullr Festival will be held January 10th-13th. www.gobreck.comInternational Snow Sculpture ChampionshipsTeams come from all around the world to compete in this snow sculpting competition held annually in Breckenridge for the last 28 years.There will be a spectacular Ice Village located in the area around the Riverwalk Center in Breckenridge. Artists begin sculpting on January 22nd and will be finished with their sculpture on the 26th. Children can participate in a Junior Snow Sculpture Class on the 27th, and sculptures will be up until the 29th. For more info: www.gobrec…
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Wintry Things To Do in Breckenridge Colorado (That Aren’t Skiing)
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One more thing...

Local and independent journalism is under threat in the West and you can change that.  With corporate raiders slashing newsrooms across the West, the PULP is one of the "Last Locals" in Colorado to produce original, compelling journalism missing in today's profit hungry world. But that costs money, time and hard work. We don't believe in spamming you with ads that's why we need your help.

For every contribution, we put 100% back into producing original and amazing journalism. That's a promise only a local and independent newsroom can promise. Take heart because you will fuel stories just like this one and the future of journalism.
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One more thing...

Local and independent journalism is under threat in the West and you can change that.  With corporate raiders slashing newsrooms across the West, the PULP is one of the "Last Locals" in Colorado to produce original, compelling journalism missing in today's profit hungry world. But that costs money, time and hard work. We don't believe in spamming you with ads and that's why we need your help.

For every contribution, we put 100% back into producing original and amazing journalism. That's a promise only a local and independent newsroom can promise. Take heart because you will fuel stories just like this one and the future of journalism.

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