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SXSW: Unofficial. Day 1

SXSW is one of most well-known indie music festivals held in Austin, Texas. It grows larger every year, with more rules and restrictions. An all access writstband was $750 in 2012 for the 5-day music portion. Some argue that all of the rules are just to keep money in the hands of the organizers. Some bands who play at an Official SXSW event were made to agree to only play one other event, making it prohibitively costly for musicians. There’s probably not much money to be made on only 2 gigs. But it could also be the big break they’ve been waiting for, with coverage by every major music media outlet.

My plan: go unofficial. It’s my first SXSW, but I’ve been to Austin numerous times, so I have a few ideas of what to expect- lots of walking, stand-still traffic jams, and as much music as I can handle. Numerous websites have databases of events, day parties and unofficial showcases, many offering free food and drinks-while they last. I prepare before the trip by finding bands I want to see, rsvping to as many shows as I can reasonably get to, up to 6 a day. I know rsvp-ing doesn’t mean I’ll get in, but I use it to keep organized with Facebook events and emails for reference. On day 1, the road trip begins at o’ dark thirty along with 2 people I’ve selected from respondants to my Craigslist rideshare posting. We take turns driving, dj-ing and napping through 3 states, stopping only for gas and potty breaks. My intent is to do it on the cheap, packing my car full of the makings for pb&j’s, fruit, snacks and water. Gas for the entire trip will be less than a single plane ticket. We reach Amarillo, Texas, the halfway point, right as the sun is coming up, perfectly timed to see sunlight reflecting off mirrored highrise buildings downtown. It’s going to be a good trip, I can already tell.

We arrive at 2:30 pm, local time, for a total of 14 hours on the road including stops. We’ve taken to running the air conditioner, mostly to clear up the foggy windows. The temperature is perfect, but the change in humidity is noticeable. One of my carpool mates, red-headed Cameron, is a former Austonian, and he takes us on a little tour when we arrive. First stop, Barton Springs/Zilker Park to strectch our legs. The park is full of people, despite it being a weekday, and parking is non-existant. Welcome to Austin. We drive to the nearest Chuy’s restaurant for happy hour, a place I’ve been once before. Purchase of a drink gives us access to the nacho bar, with delicious queso, beans, meat and 4 kinds of salsa. I fall in love with the kitschy wall art, and the PacMan themed t-shirts the servers are wearing. We gourge ourselves and then head to the greenbelt. We hike muddy trails to arrive at the Landbridge- a natural rock formation suspended 60-80 feet above the creek below. For the rest of my time there, the locals are buzzing at the fact that there’s any water at all at the greenbelt, something of a rarity. We make friends with some other people on the Landbridge, and I think to myself that people are more outgoing here. It’s nearly sundown, so we leave with plans to return and jump off on a hot day.

I drop off Cameron at the Alamo Drafthouse to meet a friend, not to see him again until the end of the week. Nathan comes back with me to the apartment I will be staying at for the week, the home of a friend since high school and former Puebloan. We take turns showering and we both sleep off the day’s long drive and hike, waking up after midnight. I drop Nathan off downtown to catch up with a friend’s band from Austrailia, his home. I don’t see him again for the week either. I return to the apartment, Carl is on his way home from work along with another friend, and they’re bringing tacos, a daily must-have in my book. This is one of the things I always miss most when I leave Austin, they’re nothing like any tacos in Pueblo. The three of us decide to take a stroll around the neighborhood, getting lost trying to find the trains we hear nearby. Is getting lost really possible though, in the day of the gps-enabled smartphone? The temperature is still perfect even though we don’t get back until late in the morning. The schedule is pretty typical for the week, good thing I’m on vacation.

See the photos from day 1 here.

Listen to my SXSW2012 mix on Spotify here.

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One more thing...

Local and independent journalism is under threat in the West and you change that.  With corporate raiders slashing newsrooms across the West, the PULP is one of the "Last Locals" in Colorado to produce original, compelling journalism missing in today's profit hungry world. But that costs money, time and hard work. We don't believe in spamming you with ads or putting up restrictive paywalls and that's why we need your help.

For every contribution, we put 100% back into producing original and amazing journalism. That's a promise only a local and independent newsroom can promise. Take heart because you will fuel stories just like this one and the future of journalism.
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Election 2012: Calling All Candidates in So. Colorado

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As we ramp up our political coverage for our 2012 Election Issue in October, we were frustrated there was not one place you could go to find all the candidates. At PULP we feel it shouldn’t be impossible to find good information on local races for voters.
Who’s running for what? Who are you electing? Where do you register to vote or where do you vote? We feel for everyone to make informed decisions it’s probably best to have a look at who’s on the ballot before you see the ballot.

So we are calling all candidates to send us their contact information. Please give us the best way voters can reach you to ask you questions or get involved with your campaign. Include your website, phone and email information and if you have them your Twitter or Facebook links.

Please send your campaign information to [email protected] with the subject ELECTION 2012.

One more thing...

Local and independent journalism is under threat in the West and you change that.  With corporate raiders slashing newsrooms across the West, the PULP is one of the "Last Locals" in Colorado to produce original, compelling journalism missing in today's profit hungry world. But that costs money, time and hard work. We don't believe in spamming you with ads or putting up restrictive paywalls and that's why we need your help.

For every contribution, we put 100% back into producing original and amazing journalism. That's a promise only a local and independent newsroom can promise. Take heart because you will fuel stories just like this one and the future of journalism.
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Blog

1st Annual Community Issue

A few months ago, we had the curious idea of having a community issue. The talk ranged from a BEST OF issue to a community guide. Then we had this amazing thought: what if for August, our community issue wasn’t told by us but by you. What if the community stages a revolt and talked about building a better community in PULP?

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Every month, PULP comes together to decide the central theme and stories we should share with you. We want to curate some of the best stories you’ve never heard or narrate the ones you have, in a different way. Since January, we’ve focused on unique stories in every issue and we are proud this voice has been well received.
A few months ago, we had the curious idea of having a community issue. The talk ranged from a BEST OF issue to a community guide. Then we had this amazing thought: what if for August, our community issue wasn’t told by us but by you. What if the community stages a revolt and talked about building a better community in PULP?

In August, for our first annual community issue, we are letting you take over the issue.

Here’s what we are looking for:

  • Tell us a story of an individual or group that’s helping Southern Colorado.
  • Tell us a story of a voice that goes unheard in our community but needs to be heard.
  • Tell us a story of someone who embodies the idea of community either here in Southern Colorado or somewhere else.
  • Tell us a story of something so interesting that it needs to be printed.
  • Show us a great photo capturing the essence of our community.
  • Tell us a story in pictures.

How to begin:

Find a good story and start writing.

Submit your article no more than 600 words. Send all submissions to [email protected]. Please include your full name and phone number where we can reach you. We will not print political or partisan editorials. We reserve the right to edit any articles for content, grammar and spelling. Your name will appear in the article. The deadline is July 15th for final submissions.

One more thing...

Local and independent journalism is under threat in the West and you change that.  With corporate raiders slashing newsrooms across the West, the PULP is one of the "Last Locals" in Colorado to produce original, compelling journalism missing in today's profit hungry world. But that costs money, time and hard work. We don't believe in spamming you with ads or putting up restrictive paywalls and that's why we need your help.

For every contribution, we put 100% back into producing original and amazing journalism. That's a promise only a local and independent newsroom can promise. Take heart because you will fuel stories just like this one and the future of journalism.
Continue Reading

Arts + Culture

Open Call: Pueblo Haiku Competition

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Submit your original haiku for possible publication in the August issue of PULP!
To be eligible for publication, the submission must be original and unpublished. Use the format of a poem with seventeen syllables, in three lines of five, seven, and five.

  • The Subjects: Pueblo and/or summer
  • Each individual may submit up to three (3) entries. Each entry must be submitted separately.
  • Submit via email to [email protected] and put HAIKU in the subject line. Submit by mail to Pueblo PULP, Attn: HAIKU, 120 S. Union Ave., Pueblo, CO 81003.
  • Include your full name, city of residence and phone number with each submission.
  • To be eligible for publication, entries must be received by July 10th.

One more thing...

Local and independent journalism is under threat in the West and you change that.  With corporate raiders slashing newsrooms across the West, the PULP is one of the "Last Locals" in Colorado to produce original, compelling journalism missing in today's profit hungry world. But that costs money, time and hard work. We don't believe in spamming you with ads or putting up restrictive paywalls and that's why we need your help.

For every contribution, we put 100% back into producing original and amazing journalism. That's a promise only a local and independent newsroom can promise. Take heart because you will fuel stories just like this one and the future of journalism.
Continue Reading

One more thing...

Local and independent journalism is under threat in the West and you change that.  With corporate raiders slashing newsrooms across the West, the PULP is one of the "Last Locals" in Colorado to produce original, compelling journalism missing in today's profit hungry world. But that costs money, time and hard work. We don't believe in spamming you with ads or putting up restrictive paywalls and that's why we need your help.

For every contribution, we put 100% back into producing original and amazing journalism. That's a promise only a local and independent newsroom can promise. Take heart because you will fuel stories just like this one and the future of journalism.

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