Connect with us

Taste

Irish whiskey: A brief history

Published

on

Irish whiskey

Lix on the TV show The Hour once posited that, “Whiskey is god’s way of telling us he loves us and wants us to be happy.” But practically speaking, God didn’t invent whiskey, the Irish did. Whiskey was first created by Irish monks who decided to distill beer. Distill beer! Why WOULDN’T you do that? Even the word “whiskey” i…

!– BEGIN THEIA POST SLIDER —

Lix on the TV show The Hour once posited that, “Whiskey is god’s way of telling us he loves us and wants us to be happy.” But practically speaking, God didn’t invent whiskey, the Irish did.
Whiskey was first created by Irish monks who decided to distill beer. Distill beer! Why WOULDN’T you do that? Even the word “whiskey” is an English bastardization of the Gaelic, uisge beatha, literally “water of life.” The oldest licensed distillery in the world is Northern Ireland’s Bushmill’s, with a charter dating back to 1608 that was signed by King James I. So what better drink to toast our Irish heritage, real or imaginary, than whiskey?
Although today Ireland is behind the US, Scotland, Canada, and even Japan when it comes to exporting whiskey, once upon a time hundreds of whiskeys were distilled in Ireland and consumed everywhere from Dublin to Malaysia, thanks to trading routes established by the British Empire. From the 18th century through to the early 20th century, if you thought of whiskey, chances were you thought of Irish whiskey.
So what happened? Two things: economics and war. After the First World War, Ireland declared its independence from Britain. What followed was the Irish War of Independence, a violent guerrilla war that decimated the Irish population and destroyed Ireland’s infrastructure. Once won, Irish independence meant that Irish distilleries could no longer rely on the British trade routes that had been used to ship Irish whiskey for the past few centuries.
Then the US, the largest consumer of Irish whiskey in the world, passed Prohibition, and Irish distillers had little interest in engaging in illegal trade with bootleggers (unlike Canadian and Scots distillers, whose whiskies are still wildly popular in the US). Shortly thereafter, the Irish Civil War tore apart the country politically, socially, and economically. Only two distilleries managed to survive all this turmoil into the 21st century: Bushmill’s and Jameson & Sons.
Irish whiskey
Irish whiskey is making a comeback, however, and chances are you’ll be able to find a few whiskeys beyond Jameson’s and Bushmill’s at your local liquor store. Power’s and Paddy’s are two of the three most popular whiskeys on the emerald isle itself. Both, along with Tullamore Dew, are actually produced in the Jameson disti…
Thanks for reading this short excerpt from the paid post! Fancy buying it to read all of it?

Read now, pay later

This article
Irish whiskey: A brief history
0.24
USD
Powered by

One more thing...

Local and independent journalism is under threat in the West and you can change that.  With corporate raiders slashing newsrooms across the West, the PULP is one of the "Last Locals" in Colorado to produce original, compelling journalism missing in today's profit hungry world. But that costs money, time and hard work. We don't believe in spamming you with ads that's why we need your help.

For every contribution, we put 100% back into producing original and amazing journalism. That's a promise only a local and independent newsroom can promise. Take heart because you will fuel stories just like this one and the future of journalism.

Taste

Distinctly a better steak house at Twenty-One Steak-pueblo-colorado

Published

on

The steak-house: a consummate example of a relatively formulaic restaurant that can be tricky to get just right. Distinctly American, though somehow removed from the normal informality that American food tends to have, a steakhouse must choose a fine balance between elegance and grit. With the pun fully intended, for as long as I’ve lived in Pueblo, a proper steakhous…

!– BEGIN THEIA POST SLIDER —

The steak-house: a consummate example of a relatively formulaic restaurant that can be tricky to get just right. Distinctly American, though somehow removed from the normal informality that American food tends to have, a steakhouse must choose a fine balance between elegance and grit. With the pun fully intended, for as long as I’ve lived in Pueblo, a proper steakhouse is rare to be well-done.
At Twenty-One Steak, though, something unusual and quite delightful has occurred. Tucked away at Pueblo’s Historic Riverwalk, it’s going for the high-end steak market in Pueblo with prices more in line with steakhouses up north. Whether you’re looking for a fancy night or you simply want a great steak without a drive, a visit to Twenty-One Steak is definitely worth the money.

The first thing you may wish to know about the place is that if you’re on a budget and you want steak, you should definitely reserve the trip for a special occasion. The second thing is that the money you end up spending will be unquestionably worthwhile—every time. It is evident that there is not a detail of this restaurant that has been overlooked or unaccounted for. For instance, the salmon in one of the appetizers is cold smoked in house using a process that takes four days. Every server has an etched nameplate on a light grey shirt so that guests know whom they are speaking with. Even the steak sauce is made from scratch, starting off with a ketchup that has to be made before that.
Over a salmon terrine with dill cream cheese, asparagus, gherkin pickles, hard cooked eggs, and fried capers, I spoke with the general manager. Having left the Broadmoor on amicable terms to work for Twenty-One, he has ensured that every metric of the standard of service has been met or exceeded. For instance, six glasses adorned a two person table at the beginning of the service as well as an impressively heavy set of cutlery. Nearly every option in the bar has been chosen to complement a menu item in some fashion or another, by way of his experienced palette.
The service is top notch, for reasons including that every server is limited to a number of people they can serve in an evening. Surprisingly (and unlike places up north), Twenty-One is fueled by 23 staff members, most of them students. Even the kitchen is fueled in part by local college students as, af…
Thanks for reading this short excerpt from the paid post! Fancy buying it to read all of it?

Read now, pay later

This article
Distinctly a better steak house at Twenty-One Steak-pueblo-colorado
0.24
USD
Powered by

One more thing...

Local and independent journalism is under threat in the West and you can change that.  With corporate raiders slashing newsrooms across the West, the PULP is one of the "Last Locals" in Colorado to produce original, compelling journalism missing in today's profit hungry world. But that costs money, time and hard work. We don't believe in spamming you with ads that's why we need your help.

For every contribution, we put 100% back into producing original and amazing journalism. That's a promise only a local and independent newsroom can promise. Take heart because you will fuel stories just like this one and the future of journalism.
Continue Reading

Taste

Sweet and bold, Pueblo’s Fruit Bar is a fresh oasis

Published

on

As the dog days of summer hazily make their way into southern Colorado, most of us (myself included) are counting down the days until cooler weather appears. But if I’ve learned anything in all my years as a Coloradan, it’s that summer never goes down without a fight, and often sticks around as long as she can.As the do…

!– BEGIN THEIA POST SLIDER —

As the dog days of summer hazily make their way into southern Colorado, most of us (myself included) are counting down the days until cooler weather appears. But if I’ve learned anything in all my years as a Coloradan, it’s that summer never goes down without a fight, and often sticks around as long as she can.As the dog days of summer hazily make their way into southern Colorado, most of us (myself included) are counting down the days until cooler weather appears. But if I’ve learned anything in all my years as a Coloradan, it’s that summer never goes down without a fight, and often sticks around as long as she can.With this in mind, I step into Pueblo’s Fruit Bar, newly opened mere steps from the Riverwalk downtown. You see, in hot weather such as the current wave we are in, the body and indeed the soul craves cold, refreshing and most importantly nutritious eats and treats. But why a fruit place, you ask? What could possibly be interesting about a place that only does fruit?The short answer is everything, but the long one will take a bit more explanation.For starters, Pueblo’s Fruit Bar looks great inside, a tidy corner shop with window seating and pleasant personnel. It has a bit of a Mexican soda shop feel, which is spot on when their menu is considered. Because this fruit bar is hiding some seriously fun snacks, from classic concession fares like nachos and hot dogs, not to mention Mexican elotes (a Mexican street corn on the cob engulfed in copious amounts of chili, lime, mayo and Parmesan cheese, served either on the cob or in a cup). On the sweeter side, summertime classics like milkshakes and soft serve ice cream are also available for those in want of.The Crown Jewels of this fruit bar are their fruit dishes, all of which are assigned numbers upon the wall. After a few moments are spent deciding, my partn…
Thanks for reading this short excerpt from the paid post! Fancy buying it to read all of it?

Read now, pay later

This article
Sweet and bold, Pueblo’s Fruit Bar is a fresh oasis
0.24
USD
Powered by

One more thing...

Local and independent journalism is under threat in the West and you can change that.  With corporate raiders slashing newsrooms across the West, the PULP is one of the "Last Locals" in Colorado to produce original, compelling journalism missing in today's profit hungry world. But that costs money, time and hard work. We don't believe in spamming you with ads that's why we need your help.

For every contribution, we put 100% back into producing original and amazing journalism. That's a promise only a local and independent newsroom can promise. Take heart because you will fuel stories just like this one and the future of journalism.
Continue Reading

Arts + Culture

Say hello to the new trend in wine: pop-top cans

Published

on

It’s five o’clock somewhere, and you decide now’s the perfect time to pop the top on an adult beverage and chill in your favorite hangout spot: the backyard, the couch, a boat. You fill in the blank. The only thing wrong with this picture? You don’t like beer. But wait! What’s in your can isn’t beer at all, but wine…

!– BEGIN THEIA POST SLIDER —

It’s five o’clock somewhere, and you decide now’s the perfect time to pop the top on an adult beverage and chill in your favorite hangout spot: the backyard, the couch, a boat. You fill in the blank. The only thing wrong with this picture? You don’t like beer. But wait! What’s in your can isn’t beer at all, but wine.
Wine in can? It’s not as bizarre as it sounds. Wine has been available in cans for a long time, but no one drank it because it was gross. Recently, however, new canning technology has made canning wine easier. As a result, a mix of big conglomerate wine companies (Flip Flop, Barefoot, etc.) and small, family-run wineries have made the leap to canned wines with the goal of elevating this neglected segment of the market.
And it’s working: according to Nielsen, canned wine sales rose by 125.2 percent in 2016, prompting publications from Bloomberg to Wine Enthusiast to declare canned wine one of the top trends of 2017.
Why would anyone drink canned wine? For the same reason people drink canned beer: convenience. Cans are smaller and more portable than a bottle of wine, and they can go to places like beaches and parks where glass isn’t allowed.
Let’s imagine a scenario where you want to go for a hike, say to the top of Long’s Peak. And when you get to the summit of Long’s Peak you want to celebrate with a toast of wine, because why wouldn’t you. In ye olden tymes, to make your dream a reality you’d have to buy a big ol’ bottle of wine, lug that fat sucker up 14,259 feet, remember to pack a corkscrew, take the cork out, find somewhere to put the cork so you’re not a litter bug, and then face the option of either drinking the whole bottle (not the best idea, because elevation) or recorking it and carrying it back down the mountain, praying that it won’t leak or break on the way.
Now, thanks to the wonder of modern technology, you just grab a can of wine, toss it into your backpack, drink it and be done.
Sounds appealing, doesn’t it? Canned wines can go anywhere someone 21 years or older can: movies, picnics, lunch breaks. The sky’s the limit.
Before you go all in, it’s worth noting that canned wine does have its drawbacks. First of all is price. While Trader Joe’s sells canned wine for $1 a can (not in Colorado, though, don’t get too excited), most go for $20-$30 for a set of four. That’s more than the average person spends on a bottle of everyday wine. It seems like an intimidating price point even though most cans contain about 2.5 servings of wine, so you’d get several bottles out of a pack.
Another issue is aroma. The closed top on cans compl…
Thanks for reading this short excerpt from the paid post! Fancy buying it to read all of it?

Read now, pay later

This article
Say hello to the new trend in wine: pop-top cans
0.24
USD
Powered by

One more thing...

Local and independent journalism is under threat in the West and you can change that.  With corporate raiders slashing newsrooms across the West, the PULP is one of the "Last Locals" in Colorado to produce original, compelling journalism missing in today's profit hungry world. But that costs money, time and hard work. We don't believe in spamming you with ads that's why we need your help.

For every contribution, we put 100% back into producing original and amazing journalism. That's a promise only a local and independent newsroom can promise. Take heart because you will fuel stories just like this one and the future of journalism.
Continue Reading

One more thing...

Local and independent journalism is under threat in the West and you can change that.  With corporate raiders slashing newsrooms across the West, the PULP is one of the "Last Locals" in Colorado to produce original, compelling journalism missing in today's profit hungry world. But that costs money, time and hard work. We don't believe in spamming you with ads and that's why we need your help.

For every contribution, we put 100% back into producing original and amazing journalism. That's a promise only a local and independent newsroom can promise. Take heart because you will fuel stories just like this one and the future of journalism.

Newsletter

The Colorado

Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending