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Colorado could finally change Columbus Day to Cabrini Day

Colorado is one step closer to replacing Columbus Day with Cabrini Day as a way to pay homage to the early 19th and 20th struggles of Italian Americans in Colorado.

Why this matters?

The change to Cabrini Day would represent a compromise of sorts to still recognize Italian-Americans and the early immigrants while not changing the state holiday to Indigenous People’s Day as other states have done.

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PULP Colorado


What happened?

The Colorado State Senate, on Tuesday, voted on Tuesday 19-15 to replace Columbus Day with Frances Xavier Cabrini Day.

Colorado State Senate


This change is being done for Indigenous peoples.

“Indigenous people suffered a great deal following the arrival of Columbus, and his actions have caused pain that has lasted centuries. For descendants of native populations, Columbus Day serves as a dark reminder of the violent past their ancestors endured.

Colorado Senate Democrats


What they are saying?

“Colorado has an opportunity to replace a holiday that is extremely painful for indigenous communities with a celebration of an Italian-American woman who has made an impact serving children in Colorado and beyond.” 

“I’m proud that we took another step towards honoring indigenous voices and ending the cruel, yearly reminder of their painful past.” 

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CO State Senator Angela Williams


What happens next?

The bill goes before Governor Jared Polis for final approval.

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PULP Colorado


Who was Frances Xavier Cabrini and what’s her connection to Colorado?(Wikipedia)

In 1904, Cabrini established Denver’s Queen of Heaven Orphanage for girls, including many orphans of local Italian miners. In 1910, she purchased rural property from the town of Golden, on the east slope of Lookout Mountain, as a summer camp for the girls. A small farming operation was established and maintained by three of the Sisters of the Sacred Heart. The camp dormitory, built of native rock and named the Stone House, was completed in 1914 and later listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[20]

Let’s tell a better story ofColorado.