Connect with us

News

Cannabis for canines? In Colorado, some pet owners see the health benefits for their ailing dogs

Published

on

Owners of Aspen, a 12-year-old golden retriever/Australian Shepherd mix have been treating the dog with cannabidiol after the dog was diagnosed with bone cancer and had a leg amputated more than a year ago. (Hugh Carey/Summit Daily via AP)

FRISCO, Colo. — The only signs of aging the 12-year-old golden retriever/ Australian shepherd mix shows are the gray hairs peppered throughout his mostly black coat. He has an obvious limp, but it’s hard to expect anything different for a dog only sporting three legs. The loveable 60-pound mutt named Aspen easily bounces from one room to the next in his Summit Cove home, showing no signs of pain when going from lying down to “sitting pretty” on his hind legs when he expects a treat. Aspen is almost a year past what he was expected to live after his diagnosis with a terminal illness, and other than missing one of his limbs, you wouldn’t be able to tell.

SEARCHING FOR HELP AFTER A DIFFICULT DIAGNOSIS

In this Thursday, March 29, 2018, photograph, Aspen plays with owner Lauren Forcey in Breckenridge, Colo. Forcey and her husband have been treating Aspen, Colo., with cannabidiol since the dog was diagnosed with bone cancer, which required the amputation of one of the dog’s legs. (Hugh Carey/Summit Daily via AP)

About 12 years ago in Denver, Andy Demaline’s roommate came home with a 3-month-old puppy he purchased from the back of a truck in a parking lot. With one dog already, the roommate quickly discovered that he wasn’t able to handle both, and within a week, Demaline had taken the puppy as his own.

Aspen was at Demaline’s side for a move to Florida, back to Summit County, meeting and marrying his wife, Lauren Forcey — he was even in the wedding. Aspen was there when they bought their first house together — all the major life changes that a faithful dog participates in next to his human companion.

So it could only be expected that the couple was devastated when they heard the dreaded word that no one ever, anywhere, wants to hear: cancer. X-rays revealed Aspen had bone cancer in his left leg in December 2016, after he was taken to the vet a couple times for a limp that wouldn’t go away. The vet gave them three options: amputate the leg, amputation combined with chemotherapy or load him up on pain medications and hope for the best. With amputation he was expected to live another three or four months. With pain medication he would probably only see about a month or two. An expensive option, amputation plus chemotherapy gave him the longest expectancy, but it would still only ward off the cancer for maybe a year.

Forcey and Demaline decided on amputation only, the best option to help minimize the dog’s pain, and Aspen had the surgery on Jan. 2, 2017. Demaline scoured the internet for information on pet cancer. One thing he kept coming across was cannabidiol, or CBD, found naturally in cannabis plants. Success stories for both humans and animals for a variety of conditions pushed the couple to pursue the treatment option for Aspen, with hopes that at minimum it would help ease his pain, at best it would slow the growth or even kill cancer cells.

CBD FOR PETS

Cannabidiol is one of the active cannabinoids identified in cannabis that has recently been receiving attention for its therapeutic potential. It lacks the psychoactive effects of THC, which is important when treating pets. Companies are jumping on the CBD bandwagon, routinely offering new products infused with CBD — sprays, oils, edibles, lotions, protein powders, pet treats, lip balm — touting relief from pain and inflammation, seizures, anxiety, nausea and aiding in weight loss.

At Farmers Korner Veterinary Hospital in Breckenridge, veterinarian Denisa Court said she has clients who ask her about CBD for their pets’ ailments almost daily. Her advice depends on the dog’s health and medical problems.

“My opinion is that there are likely medical benefits of CBD products for our patients,” she said. “With more research we can feel confident about their benefits and risks and then incorporate CBD therapy into our patient’s overall treatment plan.”

To date, she said, there are no published scientific studies documenting medical benefits and potential risks of CBD therapy in dogs and cats, although there are two studies currently underway evaluating potential benefits for epileptic dogs not responding to available anti-seizure therapies.

While anecdotally there have been success stories, Court warns that pets respond differently than people to many drugs and some foods, so there is a potential for negative effects when using these products.

While Court will discuss CBD products with clients in more detail if the pet owner expresses an interest, she does not prescribe CBD therapy.

“Legally, as CBD products are schedule I controlled substances, veterinarians working in clinical practice are not allowed to dispense or possess any types of schedule I substances.”

Breckenridge resident Deanna Carew first began using CBD products for a Siberian husky who had gone through two knee surgeries plus a back surgery and had severe anxiety during thunderstorms. She noticed once he was on it his reactions had calmed.

“With the arthritis I can assume he felt better, I think it helped,” Carew said. “With the thunderstorms and anxiety, I know it helped.”

A GROWING BUT UNREGULATED INDUSTRY

Dr. James Gaynor, who specializes in anesthesiology and pain management at Peak Performance Veterinary Group in Frisco, said clients first started asking him about using CBD around 2014.

He felt the potential to help was there, but it was a little dicey because animals have such a low toxic threshold for THC, and many of the oils were alcohol-based. As more hemp-based products became available, he found there was still variability between what was in different products, and even the effects with the same product. This is one reason why he can’t offer his clients advice on dosing instructions. He contacted the manufacturers but ran into roadblocks with companies citing proprietary formulation.

“In the nutraceutical world, there’s a problem because there’s not much oversight. what they say is on the label, may not truly be what’s in it,” he said.

Frustrated that he couldn’t give his clients a definitive answer on what products are best for their pets, he created his own CBD product in 2017 called Peak Therapeutics.

“From a pain management perspective. there is a relationship to the mechanism of action that is similar to opioids, narcotics,” Gaynor said. “They work through different receptors, but those receptors work through the same signaling system. So there’s no surprise they can produce good pain relief.”

Gaynor typically uses CBD as an adjunct to other pain relievers and anti-inflammatories.

“In my world, its role is second or third tier,” he said.

Gaynor cautions that veterinarians have to be careful not to give pet owners false hope with a new product that they don’t know much about.

“I always tell people, this is not the silver bullet,” Gaynor said. “This isn’t the magic cure for everything. It has the potential to do a lot of things. . It’s just going to take time to figure all of that out.”

NOT ALL CBDS ARE CREATED EQUAL

Veterinarians Court and Gaynor both stressed the importance of choosing the right CBD product.

“There are tests performed by the FDA that have found many products did not have the amount of CBD that they claimed were in the product and some products had no CBD detected at all,” Court said.

It’s important to purchase a hemp-based product over one created with marijuana, but hemp can be grown in areas where there is soil contamination. What pet owners need to look for, Gaynor said, is if a company can provide a laboratory analysis of what is in the product.

Steve Smith, president and co-founder of Pet Releaf — a company based in Littleton, Colorado, that creates CBD products for pets — said the hemp plant is a bioaccumulator, which means it sucks everything from the soil into the plant. Some countries use hemp plants for phytoremediation — to pull toxins and contaminants from the soil.

Smith, who started the company in the early days of CBD products six years ago, recommends pet owners purchase items from a pet store over a dispensary, and spend some time researching the product.

“The number one thing people should ask is where was the hemp grown, and can you prove it,” he said.

A MIRACULOUS RECOVERY

Forcey and Demaline started Aspen on CBD treatments right after the surgery to amputate his leg, along with the additions of flax seed and turmeric supplements and a slight diet change. While they have no way of knowing for sure whether the product has helped his pain or done anything to treat the cancer, they do know they have been given almost an entire year of additional time with Aspen.

On April 2 — 15 months after amputation — the couple took Aspen to the vet and had an X-ray done on his chest and remaining front leg to check for cancer. They all came back clean — Aspen is cancer free.

They’ve decided to leave Aspen on the CBD treatments, and have also decided to start giving CBD oil to their other dog, Sammy, for her arthritis.

“While we would love to know how and why we’ve had so much extra time with Aspen, I don’t think anyone can definitively say why that is,” Forcey said. “Perhaps the cancer was caught in time and fully removed from his body when they amputated his leg with the tumor. Maybe the CBD/THCa (inactive THC) really did clear the cancer out of his system after the surgery, or maybe his genes were strong enough to do the work.

“However, I am quite sure that the CBD has allowed him to stay comfortable and relatively pain-free throughout his recovery and has kept him the happy, lovable guy that we’ve always known.”

___

Information from: Summit Daily News, http://www.summitdaily.com/

One more thing...

Local and independent journalism is under threat in the West and you change that.  With corporate raiders slashing newsrooms across the West, the PULP is one of the "Last Locals" in Colorado to produce original, compelling journalism missing in today's profit hungry world. But that costs money, time and hard work. We don't believe in spamming you with ads or putting up restrictive paywalls and that's why we need your help.

For every contribution, we put 100% back into producing original and amazing journalism. That's a promise only a local and independent newsroom can promise. Take heart because you will fuel stories just like this one and the future of journalism.

Colorado

Western wild fires continue to rage as authorities worry over July 4 fireworks

Published

on

A growing wildfire destroyed more than 100 homes in the Colorado mountains, while other blazes across the parched U.S. West kept hundreds of other homes under evacuation orders and derailed holiday plans.

Authorities announced late Monday that a fire near Fort Garland, about 205 miles (330 kilometers) southwest of Denver, had destroyed 104 homes in a mountain housing development started by multimillionaire publisher Malcolm Forbes in the 1970s. The damage toll could rise because the burn area is still being surveyed.

Tamara Estes’ family cabin, which her parents had built in 1963 using wood and rocks from the land, was among the homes destroyed.

“I think it’s sinking in more now. But we’re just crying,” she said. “My grandmother’s antique dining table and her hutch are gone.”

“It was a sacred place to us,” she added.

Andy and Robyn Kuehler watched flames approach their cabin via surveillance video from their primary residence in Nebraska.

“We just got confirmation last night that the house was completely gone. It’s … a very sickening feeling watching the fire coming towards the house,” the couple wrote in an email Tuesday.

The blaze, labeled the Spring Fire, is one of six large wildfires burning in Colorado and is the largest at 123 square miles (318 square kilometers) — about five times the size of Manhattan. While investigators believe it was started by a spark from a fire pit, other fires, like one that began burning in wilderness near Fairplay, were started by lightning.

Nearly 60 large, active blazes are burning across the West, including nine in New Mexico and six each in Utah and California, according to the National Interagency Fire Center.

In Utah, authorities have evacuated 200 to 300 homes because of a growing wildfire near a popular fishing reservoir southeast of Salt Lake City amid hot temperatures and high winds. Several structures have been lost since the fire started Sunday, but it’s unclear how many, said Jason Curry of the Utah Division of Forest, Fire and State Lands.

Darren Lewis and his extended family planned to spend the Fourth of July at a cabin built nearly 50 years ago by his father and uncle in a wilderness area nestled between canyons and near a mountain river.

Instead, Lewis and his family will spend the holiday nervously waiting to hear if a half-century of family memories go up in smoke because of the fire, which has grown to 47 square miles (122 square kilometers).

“There’s a lot of history and memories that go into this cabin,” said Lewis, 44, of Magna, Utah. “The cabin we could rebuild, but the trees that we love would be gone. We’re just hoping that the wind blows the other way.”

Meanwhile, a wind-fueled wildfire in Northern California that continues to send a thick layer of smoke and ash south of San Francisco was threatening more than 900 buildings.

The massive blaze was choking skies with ash and smoke, prompting some officials to cancel Fourth of July fireworks shows and urge people to stay indoors to protect themselves from the unhealthy air.

At least 2,500 people have been told to evacuate as the so-called County Fire continues to spread, said Anthony Brown, a spokesman with the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

Brown said the blaze, which started Saturday and is surging through rugged terrain northwest of Sacramento, has grown to 113 square miles (294 square kilometers) amid hot and dry weather expected throughout the day. It was 15 percent contained Tuesday.

“The weather is better than what we had over the weekend. But it’s still hampering our efforts and it’s an area of concern,” he said.

So far this year, wildfires have burned 4,200 square miles in the United States, according to the fire center. That’s a bit below last year’s acreage to date — which included the beginning of California’s devastating fire season — but above the 10-year average of 3,600 square miles.

Because of the Independence Day holiday, authorities are also concerned about the possibility of campfires or fireworks starting new fires because of the dry, hot conditions. In Colorado, many communities have canceled firework displays, and a number of federal public lands and counties have some degree of fire restrictions in place, banning things like campfires or smoking outdoors.

In Arizona, large swaths of national forests and state trust land have been closed since before Memorial Day. Some cities have canceled fireworks displays because of extreme fire danger.

In New Mexico, all or part of three national forests remain closed because of the threat of wildfire, putting a damper on holiday camping plans. The forests that are open have strict rules, especially when it comes to fireworks.

“We’re just urging people to use extreme caution,” said Wendy Mason, a spokeswoman for the New Mexico State Forestry Division. “We want people to have fun and enjoy themselves, but we prefer they leave the fireworks shows to the professionals.”

____

Associated Press writers Brady McCombs in Salt Lake City; Susan Montoya Bryan in Albuquerque, New Mexico; Olga R. Rodriguez in San Francisco; Felicia Fonseca in Flagstaff, Arizona; and Alina Hartounian in Phoenix contributed to this report.

One more thing...

Local and independent journalism is under threat in the West and you change that.  With corporate raiders slashing newsrooms across the West, the PULP is one of the "Last Locals" in Colorado to produce original, compelling journalism missing in today's profit hungry world. But that costs money, time and hard work. We don't believe in spamming you with ads or putting up restrictive paywalls and that's why we need your help.

For every contribution, we put 100% back into producing original and amazing journalism. That's a promise only a local and independent newsroom can promise. Take heart because you will fuel stories just like this one and the future of journalism.
Continue Reading

News

More firefighters called in to rein in Southern Colorado fire

Published

on

Crews struggled to rein in a wildfire that was spreading in several different directions Sunday in southern Colorado.
More firefighters were arriving to battle the blaze that has prompted the evacuation of more than 2,000 homes.
“It’s a very challenging fire, I’ll be honest with you, with all the wind changes,” Shane Greer, an incident commander with the Rocky Mountain Incident Management Team, told residents Sunday.
Authorities said the fire east of Fort Garland was estimated at 64 square miles (166 sq. kilometers) after unpredictable winds pushed the fire both north and south over the weekend.
About 500 firefighters have worked to contain the flames since the fire began Wednesday. A second team arrived in the area Sunday and plans to take over fighting the fire north of Highway 160.
The first team will focus on the area south of the highway.
“Usually with a fire we can chase it … we haven’t been able to chase this because it keeps going in at least three different directions,” Greer said.
Authorities said they began assessing some areas this weekend to track destroyed or damaged structures. But they cautioned that conditions remain dangerous and said they want to be sure that information is correct before notifying property owners.
The fire was expected to remain active and grow in intensity with a warm and dry forecast on Sunday.
Highway 160 remains closed and officials said they could not estimate when it will reopen or when the evacuation orders will end.
The Costilla County Sheriff’s Office on Saturday said a man was being held on suspicion of arson in connection with the fire. It is not clear if Jesper Joergensen, 52, has an attorney.
At Sunday’s public update, officials said they do not believe Joergensen started the fire intentionally.
State emergency management officials reported nine other fires remained active around the state on Sunday. Officials near Durango hoped that a cold front would slow down one of those. The fire began a month ago and is estimated at 77 square miles.
The Durango Herald reported that authorities planned to relocate some crews and equipment to help firefighters guarding communities as the flames moved north.

One more thing...

Local and independent journalism is under threat in the West and you change that.  With corporate raiders slashing newsrooms across the West, the PULP is one of the "Last Locals" in Colorado to produce original, compelling journalism missing in today's profit hungry world. But that costs money, time and hard work. We don't believe in spamming you with ads or putting up restrictive paywalls and that's why we need your help.

For every contribution, we put 100% back into producing original and amazing journalism. That's a promise only a local and independent newsroom can promise. Take heart because you will fuel stories just like this one and the future of journalism.
Continue Reading

News

Get to Crested Butte Colorado for a wildflower wonderland

Published

on

Crested Butte’s wildflowers cast a spell on Michelle Bivens at an early age.

“It goes back to about 6 or 7 years old,” she recalls, when her family camped every summer among the vibrant arrays, library books in hand to identify the great variety that makes the mountain town “the wildflower capital of Colorado.”

With a family of her own, she bounced around from Colorado Springs, to Austin, Texas, to Woodland Park over 22 years. But in 2012, Bivens moved the husband and kids to the valley that stayed in her dreams.

“There’s no place like it,” she says — a truth that comforts wildflower buffs in dry years like these when their backyards don’t yield the typical burst.

Bivens is executive director of the Crested Butte Wildflower Festival, the weeklong celebration that starts July 6 and will mean more to flora fanatics of the Pikes Peak region and beyond.

That includes George Cameron. He’s a founder of the Native Plant Society’s local chapter, a retired botany professor who’s more than disappointed by what he’s seeing, or not, in his go-to spot, Stratton Open Space.

“This is the worst possible year,” Cameron says. “I live for the wildflowers every year, and it’s very depressing when they’re not there.”

He treasures higher displays on the mountain, those that grace Elk Park and Devils Playground, for example. And while he has yet to visit with “peak season” approaching, he fears the flowers haven’t had the moisture to bloom in abundance.

“There’s been no snowpack, nothing for them,” he says. “I’m not hopeful it’ll be very good this year.”

But for the fields and hills around Crested Butte, his faith is strong. “That’s because of the soil.”

While Pikes Peak’s granite is hydrophobic, washing away moisture, the earth surrounding the glacier-formed area of Crested Butte is composed of shale that better retains water. Snow melts, and life beneath has a better chance of emerging in all its glory.

Indeed, judging by photos out of Crested Butte, the flowers are popping a week before the festival. Snow melted earlier than usual, Bivens says, and the killing cold winds didn’t strike later.

“The good news is the flowers are coming early, and they didn’t freeze,” she says.

So Jason Odell is gearing up for a visit. The Colorado Springs photographer and teacher plans to soon escort clients to Crested Butte, to capture the scene he’s been scouting for almost two decades.

 

He encourages students to enjoy the landscape, the perfect beauty pairing with iconic Colorado ruggedness, but to also pay attention to details. He wants them to kneel before a flower, to photograph the changing shades of a columbine, the dancing of lupines, the petals splaying from an Indian paintbrush’s stem.

“I think wildflowers are so popular because they’re so ephemeral; they’re only around for a few months or sometimes even a few weeks,” Odell says. “And they have this diversity of color that normally we don’t get in our everyday landscape. … It’s being able to say you saw something totally unique.”

The flowers “pull you out of ordinary existence,” Cameron says. In his Pikes Peak Community College pupils, he sought to instill a reverence for the different species, expressing how they all grow on different terms, some appearing only once in a generation, and how they all can exist in harmony.

“There’s always something new to find out,” says Tom Zeiner, a geologist who’s made wildflowers his focus in retirement.

Naturally, he has a summer home in Crested Butte, where during the festival he leads educational hikes, guiding from the valley floor to the high-alpine zones where the colors change, where it’s common for him to spot a flower he’s never noticed before. Already, Zeiner says, he’s observed impressive swaths of glacier lilies and other classics.

But the early bloom highlights a trend concerning climate change onlookers. If the flowers show earlier, will pollinators such as bees and hummingbirds be around to ensure they last?

More immediate threats are the rising number of explorers who pick the flowers and trample off-trail, Bivens says. The nonprofit festival aims to make people “appreciate the wild places we have,” she says. What better teacher than the fragile, mysterious wildflowers?

“It really is quite a miracle that unfolds,” she says.

___

Information from: The Gazette, http://www.gazette.com

One more thing...

Local and independent journalism is under threat in the West and you change that.  With corporate raiders slashing newsrooms across the West, the PULP is one of the "Last Locals" in Colorado to produce original, compelling journalism missing in today's profit hungry world. But that costs money, time and hard work. We don't believe in spamming you with ads or putting up restrictive paywalls and that's why we need your help.

For every contribution, we put 100% back into producing original and amazing journalism. That's a promise only a local and independent newsroom can promise. Take heart because you will fuel stories just like this one and the future of journalism.
Continue Reading

Trending