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Ask Dr. Scott: Breakfast is still the best meal

Dr. Scott, I often skip breakfast. Is this a bad idea?

A: Don’t have time for breakfast, you say? You do. How much time does it really take to make breakfast? I’ll tell you. Here’s an example of a time-tested breakfast. Scrambled eggs, whole-grain toast, sliced tomato with extra-virgin olive oil and vinegar. Total time to make from the moment you enter the kitchen if you’re not quite awake: 3 minutes, 51 seconds. Eating time while watching the sunrise: 5 minutes, 49 seconds. Cleanup time: 1 minute, 57 seconds (less if you just throw things into the dishwasher).

Egg breakfasts can be your staple, and with so many varieties there’s no need to be bored of them.

Fine-tune your eating habits. Eat at least two meals a day. Your smallest meal should be dinner, with most food consumed during the early part of the day when your intestine is most efficient.
Breakfast should be a good-size meal, if not your largest meal. Your liver has only enough stored fuel to get you through the night. By morning, you’ll need more fuel to get going, and to replenish what your liver used during the night.

For many people, this includes some quality protein. It will increase your levels of norepinephrine in the brain, helping you think better, concentrate and have more mental energy. Keeping your carbohydrate foods to a minimum avoids the high levels of serotonin, which can have a calming or depressing effect on the brain, potentially diminishing your mental faculties. If you need to think after breakfast, don’t eat cereals, donuts, or pancakes. This is especially true for students who work with dangerous equipment or those who commute to work by car.

The fact that General Mills can claim Cheerios is heart-healthy is false-advertising pure and simple. Check out the advertising on Raisin Bran and you’ll see this product claims to offer you “heart health,” yet it contains 20 grams of sugar per serving. Cereal companies fill the airwaves with lies to trick the American public every single day of the year.

Hopefully by now you’re over your phobia of eggs. While they’re not just for breakfast, they just could make your first meal of the day an ideal one, and a bit easier to prepare.

Patients who learn to eat a wholesome, balanced breakfast regularly have had great success in improving their energy, mental performance, weight control, endocrine and hormonal balance, and carbohydrate addiction.

Your breakfast menu should include: Eggs any style; poached or scrambled, soft boiled or fried, hard boiled or an omelet with lots of veggies, especially avocado. Fresh fruit whether of all kinds, fresh or in a smoothie. And mix in those vegetables. Cottage cheese

  • Eggs any style;
  • poached or scrambled, soft boiled or fried, hard boiled or an omelet with lots of veggies, especially avocado. Fresh fruit whether of all kinds, fresh or in a smoothie. And mix in those vegetables. Cottage cheese
  • hard boiled or an omelet with lots of veggies, especially avocado. Fresh fruit whether of all kinds, fresh or in a smoothie. And mix in those vegetables. Cottage cheese
  • Fresh fruit whether of all kinds, fresh or in a smoothie. And mix in those vegetables. Cottage cheese
  • And mix in those vegetables.
  • Cottage cheese

For the rest of your day, here’s how to balance out having a great start breakfast.

  • Drink at least six 8-ounce glasses of water per day. Colas, sugary drinks and any drink that adds in sugar, even artificial sugars will cause your body to lose water.
  • Avoid sugar and sugar-containing foods as possible and read the labels closely. Sugar can be called sucrose, dextrose, lactose, maltose, glucose, fructose, and corn syrup. Even some artificial sweeteners actually contain sugar.
  • Avoid all hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils and fats, fried foods, and fats..
  • Limit white-flour products such as most breads, rolls, pasta, etc.
  • Include at least five to six servings of cooked or steamed vegetables each day. Use a rainbow of colors of colors to guide your vegetable diet. And eat more raw, fresh salad.
  • Eat two servings of fruit per day. Choose from the less sweet fruits – grapefruit, berries (strawberries, blueberries, raspberries), melons, and plums.

Dr. Scott Cuthbert is the chief clinician at the Chiropractic Health Center in Pueblo, Colorado, as well as the author of three new textbooks and over 50 peer-reviewed research articles. PuebloChiropracticCenter.com.

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