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Say hello to the new trend in wine: pop-top cans

via Ruza Wines

It’s five o’clock somewhere, and you decide now’s the perfect time to pop the top on an adult beverage and chill in your favorite hangout spot: the backyard, the couch, a boat. You fill in the blank. The only thing wrong with this picture? You don’t like beer. But wait! What’s in your can isn’t beer at all, but wine.

Wine in can? It’s not as bizarre as it sounds. Wine has been available in cans for a long time, but no one drank it because it was gross. Recently, however, new canning technology has made canning wine easier. As a result, a mix of big conglomerate wine companies (Flip Flop, Barefoot, etc.) and small, family-run wineries have made the leap to canned wines with the goal of elevating this neglected segment of the market.

And it’s working: according to Nielsen, canned wine sales rose by 125.2 percent in 2016, prompting publications from Bloomberg to Wine Enthusiast to declare canned wine one of the top trends of 2017.

Why would anyone drink canned wine? For the same reason people drink canned beer: convenience. Cans are smaller and more portable than a bottle of wine, and they can go to places like beaches and parks where glass isn’t allowed.

Let’s imagine a scenario where you want to go for a hike, say to the top of Long’s Peak. And when you get to the summit of Long’s Peak you want to celebrate with a toast of wine, because why wouldn’t you. In ye olden tymes, to make your dream a reality you’d have to buy a big ol’ bottle of wine, lug that fat sucker up 14,259 feet, remember to pack a corkscrew, take the cork out, find somewhere to put the cork so you’re not a litter bug, and then face the option of either drinking the whole bottle (not the best idea, because elevation) or recorking it and carrying it back down the mountain, praying that it won’t leak or break on the way.

Now, thanks to the wonder of modern technology, you just grab a can of wine, toss it into your backpack, drink it and be done.

Sounds appealing, doesn’t it? Canned wines can go anywhere someone 21 years or older can: movies, picnics, lunch breaks. The sky’s the limit.

Before you go all in, it’s worth noting that canned wine does have its drawbacks. First of all is price. While Trader Joe’s sells canned wine for $1 a can (not in Colorado, though, don’t get too excited), most go for $20-$30 for a set of four. That’s more than the average person spends on a bottle of everyday wine. It seems like an intimidating price point even though most cans contain about 2.5 servings of wine, so you’d get several bottles out of a pack.

Another issue is aroma. The closed top on cans completely mutes any aromas from the wine, which are a huge part of any wine’s flavor profile. Of course, you could solve this issue by pouring your canned wine into a glass, but let’s be real here. If you were going to pour wine into a glass anyway, why not just buy a bottle?

In order to counteract the lack of aroma, most canned wines have added residual sugar, which gives canned wines brighter, more fruit-forward flavors. Many are also fizzy on the tongue, even if they’re meant to be flat wines and not bubbly, a result of elevated levels of acidity to balance out the sugary sweetness.

Add to that the chill factor (you should always chill canned wine, even if it’s a red), and there’s only one thing this recipe of low alcohol content and fizzy sweetness spells: SUMMER.

If you’re looking for a decent canned wine, there are several solid options. Sofia Mini Blanc de Blanc, a sparkling wine produced by the Francis Ford Coppola Winery, was the first high-quality canned wine on the market, and remains the most popular. The design of the cans, which includes a tiny pink straw, was inspired by Japanese soda cans and has the same cute-but-cool vibe. The wine is crisp and tasty, with a ton of tropical fruit and pear notes. These cans are truly ideal for super-classy picnics. Recreating scenes from Marie Antoinette not required, but encouraged.

Another canned wine earning accolades is Underwood from Oregon’s Union Wine Company. Their cans are the exact same size as a can of soda, with an understated and subtle design, so they’re perfect for those times when you don’t want to be caught adult drinking in public. The best part? Underwood wines are complex, fruit-forward, and well-balanced, regularly scoring between 85 and 88 points on Wine Spectator and Wine Enthusiast. Try their carbonated sparkling, the closest thing you’ll find to alcoholic soda, or the Pinot noir, which is surprisingly complex.

Central California is a region carving out a name for itself in canned wine, with many small wineries turning their traditional bottles into successful canned wines. Definitely try Ruza, a dry rosé with a tingly finish that’s simply delightful on a hot day. Or search out Field Recording Wine, which makes not one but two lines of canned wine: Fiction and Alloy Wine Works. Both are seriously fruity and seriously crushable, with long finishes propelled by minerality and acidity.

Canned wines may not be for every occasion, but when it comes to getting outside in the summer they’re hard to beat for convenience. And with so many solid wineries and different styles of wine getting into the game, there’s no reason to say no to canned wine. Enjoy a can of wine? Yes you can!

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Tasha Brandstatter is a freelance arts and culture writer with a master's degree in art history, three scotties, and more books than she knows what to do with. You can find her work in History Colorado, Book Riot, Western Passages, ArtiSpectrum, and Cocktail Paparazzi, among other publications.

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