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Onward through the Fog: meet the Spirettes



You can’t appreciate the light without the dark, and the newest rays of musical light illuminating from Colorado Springs indie rockers Spirettes (pronounced Spirits) are as powerful and engrossing as a tower of 1,000 watt LEDs, while remaining undeniably and defiantly dark. Spirettes are a fascinating study in contrasts: this 5 song release is equal parts guitar-grit and heavy hypnotism, awash in powerful reverb-drenched harmonies and thunderous rhythms that ebb and flow with an indelible energy and sense of urgency that crash into your ears like a growing ocean tide, pulling you deeper and deeper under with its leaden glory. They are a hazy masterstroke of indie swell and feminine guitar rock ferocity. They are the audio equivalent to diving to the very bottom and finding a light you never knew existed. They are the fabulous Spirettes.

Your new EP is really fantastic; How long did it take to come together?

Kate Perdoni (guitar/vocals): We recorded the last days of August. It was an impromptu recording.

Kellie Palmblad (bass/vocals): We are really excited. It was recorded with a good friend of mine named Andy Jones who used to live here in Colorado. He moved to Denton Texas several years ago, and reached out to me out of nowhere when we posted that we had a new project forming  and said “totally keep me posted on this I would love to do the production. let me know if you want to record.”

Perdoni: Which we before we had even practiced. (laughs)

Palmblad: He said he was a fan of everything we had done in the past and other bands. We knew the atmosphere we wanted to create with our album, so he drove up to visit family and we knocked it out in a weekend.

Was it a lot of pressure to have someone wanting to record the band before you’d ever played together?

Perdoni: The really intimidating thing for me was that I had never let anyone record me before.  I’ve always engineered my own projects, so I was nervous about that.  But I could have not had a better experience working with Andy. It was seamless and amazing to let someone else take the helm.

Palmblad: It was magical. I enjoyed watching the decisions he made and learning from him.  he had great ideas. It was really fun and we geeked out on a guitar pedals and where to place mics and all of the technical stuff.

Perdoni: We had the same sound aesthetic, all of us; and it was like he stepped in with a magic wand to fuse it and gel it all together. It didn’t feel rushed or anything.

Palmblad: With the band, my goal is that there are 3 creative beautiful women that have great ideas, and my job is to support that and bring what I have to the table, but also know when to get out of the way; to get an honest snapshot of our creativity and vision.

Was it an intentional focus to have an all-female band?

Perdoni:  yes absolutely.

Palmblad: yes.

Any particular reason?

Palmblad: I wanted to start a female project, I wanted to do it with integrity, and we’ll hit it really hard.

I was traveling to Denver to see Courtney Barnett the night of the election;  and it was a very surreal experience; watching what was happening politically in the world at that moment and also having the experience of one of the most phenomenal shows I have ever been to. I know so many talented women; we should probably talk at some point about getting together and playing. It was quite a moment, and it made an impression on me. It felt like somewhere inside of me spiritually said now is the time to do that.

Perdoni: Kellie had actually texted me that same night and said it was time.The next day there was a group message sent and it all went from there.

It seems like the election of 2016 has galvanized a lot of different people. People understand that everything we do is political, even creating art.  What do you want this new EP to show the public politically?

Perdoni: It starts personally with personal politics for me; my constitution and force.  And music is such a pure avenue for that expression.

Palmblad: I think the recording actually really solidified that idea, actually. From the first moment we said we don’t know for sure what this is supposed to sound like, but we know all of our anger comes out so sad and angry sometimes. But the more I wrote the more it was bloody and heartfelt; it wasn’t coming out like riot girl music necessarily.

When we started, I didn’t want to start by saying the music had to sound a certain way.  I wanted it to be a product of where we were and what we wanted to bring to it. Even now I catch myself when I’m starting to impose a sound or structure I remember that my job is to sometimes just step back and let it come through instead.

Perdoni: It’s dark, and it’s mysterious. It exists in a different place; almost in a warm humid room to me.

To me it feels David Lynchian.

Palmblad: Yes, definitely. It’s manifesting all the b******* that we’ve been through in our lives and the changes that we’ve had to go through in response to the b*******. It’s the perfect time culturally to offer ourselves in that realm as Who We Are; this is our experience.

Perdoni: So many of the themes of this album are themes of death and rebirth;  phoenixes and Rising Up From the Ashes.  we had to crawl and fight and cry and kill for this. Well, maybe not kill though. (laughs)

Palmblad: Somewhere along the way with the recording, it started to have a very old style rock and roll feeling;  like the classic girl bands.  I kind of was brought back to the Shangri-las and The Ronettes. It’s kind of like that musically, but on acid.

I read recently that Colorado Springs is the one of the new “it” cities in America;  how do you feel about that as a band?

Palmblad: I’m a native to Colorado Springs. I feel like if you stick around long enough,  good things will happen eventually.  It’s nice To be recognized for the great things I’ve seen here. I’ve always believed in this city and where it exists amongst cultures and amongst the mountains. The nature here is always going to produce some really interesting extremes;  the clash of cultures that are here even though it might feel so of oppressive to have mega churches and the military here, to me it’s always been a breeding ground of innovation. We may not have a traditional way of pursuing music here in the springs, but we still make it. We make it what we want it to be.

Perdoni: My perspective is a bit different. I’m not a native here, and I’ve only lived here for 4 years, but I have so much respect for people who grew up here and stuck around. Nothing pisses me off more than the negative connotations and perceptions of Colorado Springs. Rather than focus on the negative or perceived negative elements let’s put as much energy as we would bitching and complaining about everything and instead of harness that energy into something amazing that we want to see. That’s been my ethos since I’ve been here.

Well for what it’s worth, I’ve never seen a more caring and sincere scene than the one you have here in the Springs. Everyone here I’ve met is very passionate and supportive it seems.

Perdoni: Yeah, we really care for each other.

Palmblad: It’s interesting watching the scene develop; now I go to shows end venues where you would expect to see the same core group of people you often see, and there is tons of new faces all the time. There’s a nice feeling from some of the older scene people that “whew, the back up troops have come.”

Perdoni: Yes! I feel just like in the past few years that a lot of the young people who came here for college are staying here; they’re being retained because of the community and culture that is being created. And they are contributing so much to the sustainability of the arts scene.

If you had to describe Spirettes to someone what would you say?

Palmblad: a dark twist on classic girl groups; that’s what it’s sounding like to me the more I hear it.

Perdoni:  An unwieldy wildness! (laughs)

What do you want people to come away with after listening to the record?

Perdoni: I want people to feel really inspired to create their own world. And to feel supported;  to feel everything that we feel when we were making music together; alive, thrilled, expressed, all of the things that until recently not just women but all different types of people were told they were not allowed to express. You don’t have to do that anymore. You can be honest. I want people to feel true to themselves.

Palmblad: It’s bittersweet and also powerful. It’s okay to feel a little bit of nostalgia when you hear it;  it’s okay if you catch the references. But if you can experience the songs and tell us what you hear when they listen to us, we’d love to hear it, too.

The self titled debut from Spirettes is available at Upcoming live dates and more at

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CO Springs emcee Che Bong goes outer limits on new psychedelic full length



Electro-Soul Hip Hop | Che Bong – From the dusty ‘Amen break’ heavy loop-gone-psychedelic of album opener Telescope to the lo-fi space rockin’ of album ender The Paradox of Time, CS emcee Che Bong (of Bullhead*ded) has really outdone himself and the genre itself on Telescope to the Heavens. With an album full of immersive and challenging-yet-chill hip hop musicality that owes just as much to free jazz and psychedelic rock as it does to hip hop and neo-soul, Che is on some next level stuff.  Get. On. It.

90’s inspired Alt-Punk | Hooper – “No Monument” from Denver Rock City punkers Hooper does a couple things very well; it provides stellar songwriting and momentum building, gives a healthy shot in the arm of indie-slathered 90s era punk rock, and in doing both provides a direct line to the sonic and perhaps more importantly workhorse aesthetic of the nascent indie punk heyday of the 90s. Trip out on that, holmes!

Blackened Sludge-Punks | Worry – The newest EP from Colorado Springs heavies Worry is not for the faint of heart, smashing heads on the punk rock with a bludgeoning mix of seething sludge metal and intrinsically intense hardcore know-how. Monolithic and absolutely monstrous, the seven raw cuts on A Celebration of Suffering are gloriously bleak, blackened and smolder with an actual extremity that most other “extreme” bands often lack.

Slow Burn Indie Rock | Wrinkle – Mind melding and photosynthesizing the big hook power-pop of early Weezer and the Rentals with the wide-eyed indie bend of Neva Dinova and Cursive, Denver’s indie rock supergroup of sorts Wrinkle are a slackers fever dream; a haze of unaffected yet disaffected indie-fed pop rock that first and foremost rules and that is more commercially viable than them nor I would care to admit on their newest offering A Kaleidoscope of Butterflies.

All releases available for purchase now thru Bandcamp. Go Local!

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Raw Rock & Roll and dark Blues collide with Denver’s the Velveteers



At only six tracks long, this brand new self-titled EP via Denver’s the Velveteers (Recorded on warm analog tape at Silo Sound Studios in Denver) is a half-hour long magic spell; a concoction of twisted psychedelic undercurrent and blues-rock guitar histrionics draped in the smoky and arresting vocals of one Demi Demitro. Demi, along with co-founder and multi-instrumentalist John Demitro, conjure the kind of gnarled, foot-stomping rhythms and riffs that have dual citizenship between the acid-laced Led Zeppelin 70’s arena-rock heyday and the modern fuzz drenched, psychedelic revival of now.

Musically, this 2 piece makes quite the racket. Raw rock and roll power and deep, dark blues mystique collide head on. If you want a band that can riff, look no further! You may snap your neck clean off from all the head nodding you’ll involuntarily be doing. Like a confession to the dark lord himself, the Velveteers pen the kind of dirty rock and roll diddies that are a conduit for the heathen in all of us. With lyrical gems like “You know just what your doing to me / but heaven knows what’s up your sleeves” (off of the sublime album midpoint “Bloody Little Secrets”), Velveteers delve into the dark and macabre underbelly of the mind and bring back blues-laced musical treasures for the world to behold. We should be so lucky.

“The Velveteers” is streaming (and for sale hint hint) via Bandcamp now. Live dates and more info on Facebook.

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Building up with Pueblo’s Beyond Bridges



Reggae is a largely misunderstood musical genre; not only was it not invented solely by Bob Marley in the mid 70’s (who himself had even deeper musical roots with the Wailing Wailers in the early 60’s) like too many think, but it also encompasses an ever-growing and changing past, present and future, including entirely new groups of evolutionary musicians finding new ways to carry the island rhythms forward.

Forging driving and endearing music with reggae at the center, Pueblo’s own Beyond Bridges is at the forefront of such endeavors. Much more than your average reggae act, the band also harnesses elements of heavy So-Cal surf rock and alternative music, at times exploding with overdriven,intertwined and complex soloing a la metal gods Iron Maiden and monster stadium rock choruses. While the juxtaposition on paper seems odd, this quartet navigates such choppy and uncertain waters with ease, heavy riff-laden rock eased up with soothing dubbed-out reggae refrain.

All of this has come to a head with “On My Mind,” the first EP from Beyond Bridges; 5 songs from a formidable band of brothers who are here to have a good time and help you do the same.

John Bueno (PULP): I’m a few listens in to your new EP, and I gotta say, I’m a bit surprised something like this is coming out of Pueblo. Not in a bad way though; it’s just it isn’t something we usually have here.

Adrian Hernandez (bass/vocals): We’re all from here. So we get it. And we all know that there’s a stigma about anything coming out from here. But we’d like to think we can break through that.

Tony Garcia (guitar): I feel like there’s a new generation here; and they’re interested in progressing. It’s not “Pueblo can’t do this” anymore; now it’s more like “Pueblo SHOULD do this.” Kind of go beyond what we are comfortable with.

Speaking of going beyond, does the name Beyond Bridges represent that idea?

TG: Actually, when Kai (Furuto; multi instrumentalist and vocalist of Beyond Bridges) and I started this as a duo act, we would always write songs that would end up having this complex bridge part that would kind of veer off into solos and stuff. So we were looking for something involving bridges. We wanted to call it Bed Bath and Beyond Bridges. (laughs)

AH: It was too hard to license the logo. (laughs)

Your new EP was recorded and produced with Lastleaf Audio here in town; is this your first?

AH: Yes it is.

How was the making of it?

AH: Well, it was my first complete thing, so I don’t have a lot to compare it to. But we tried to go into a studio once early on, and maybe it was too early; but working with Matt (Herrera/ Lastleaf engineer) was a totally different experience; much more comfortable this time.

Some producers have a tendency to be a little too hands on or assertive when working with bands; it may sound soft, but most musicians are sensitive. Especially when it comes to something they’ve created. It was great having Matt, because he’s not the type to push you into what he wants you to do; he lets you guide yourself to the best sound and arrangement.

Kyle Spinuzzi (drums): We did drums the first day, and it was super easy. Matt is so great to work with. His place was comfortable to produce in and I went in confident. Plus it’s nice to do this in our hometown; not everyone gets that opportunity.

TG: It was really interesting for me. I do and run sound a lot, but it’s a totally different thing from raw live sound to the mixing and mastering stage; I knew what our sound was and what we could do, but it was really cool to turn that into an end result. It was a learning process the whole way.

I like that Matt didn’t autotune a thing, either. There’s very little correction on anything. We got a raw sound from him. There were a lot of takes involved to do that, though.

AH: Mostly because I was moving my feet while recording.

TG: But Matt wanted that to be us, in our raw stage, maybe with a little more sparkle. Moving forward,  I’ll take all of this in for our next recording as a guide for sure.

That’s a definite plus to do all the recording and mastering in town. Way easier I would think. You don’t have to rush it.

TG: We did it over the holidays, right when everyone was already busy.

AH: Oh yeah; the time span was over like 4 months or so. There was no big rush with Matt; he was never standing over us looking at his watch saying “you got a half hour” or anything like that. We were able to go over every song layer by layer, instrument by instrument, until we felt great about all of it. We were able to stay in a creative mindset that way.

It was also done like, 2 blocks from my childhood home. Which is pretty cool. (laughs)

AH: Also Kai, who is not here, is a big part of the sound too. He plays a bit of everything on the record, helped write the songs. He is our firecracker!

When it comes out, what do you hope listeners come away with from the after hearing it?

TG: Our music comes from a lot of different places; we aren’t gonna stick to a single musical genre. We like to use different genres like spices, you know? We’re not strictly a reggae band. We’ll use reggae as a spice, ska as a spice, rock and alternative as a spice; but the end product is a natural recording of who we are as a unit. The exact tones from that album are the same ones coming from my guitar; Adrian’s voice is pure and clean and beautiful. Kyle’s drumming is to a click. (laughs)

AH: There’s always some vulnerability to releasing something that you’ve worked on, you know? That’s another plus for working with Matt. I was talking to my dad today and I told him that good or bad, it’s gonna be out there; and it’s good to know that during the process of making the album the person you’re doing it with is making everyone comfortable with your creativity. You need to be wholehearted for it to come out organically.

Do you feel like Colorado is warm to you as a band?

AH: I think we are lucky to be from here; and Pueblo is lucky to be here right now. The reggae scene is absolutely flourishing right now, which is probably in no small part to the marijuana industry. But that’s another story. But that niche audience lives in Colorado; we’re able to be who we are as a band and still have these great opportunities, which is not something a lot of people get to say. We are able to fit in with bands all over the reggae spectrum because we don’t just stick to a sound; we like to just write songs, however they come out as individual creations.

So Colorado is a good home base then?

TG: Colorado is my base for sure. I am always down for it. I love it here.

AH: Absolutely. I think this is the most beautiful state in the country; I may have only been to like 12 other states, so I’m no almanac (laughs). But I feel proud and extremely lucky to be here, especially as a musician. This may be silly to some, but the idea that one day I might get to play at Red Rocks (Amphitheatre) is a huge driving force and motivation to keep doing what we’re doing.

That’s quite the goal!

AH: Baby steps, man.

Anything you’d like to see done differently here in the area as far as the music scene goes?

TG: It would be nice if Pueblo helped build its’ music scene. There aren’t too many live music venues here, but maybe the culture just isn’t quite there yet.

AH: I think it would be in Pueblo’s best interest to grab hold onto the artists we already have here. We could have a renaissance of sorts! It’s something we’ve talked about probably since I was a kid, but harnessing that artist energy from the area and giving more avenues to come out would do a lot, especially in this downtown area. But as is, I love this town right now too. It doesn’t get enough love or credit. We just wanna show people part of the arts that have always been here.

As a band, you maintain a pretty consistent live schedule, though. Any plans on taking it on the road more?

TG: Definitely. We’d like to create more small tours with bands that come through. Over the last year and half or so, we’ve had the chance to watch and learn from so many different bands. We get to see bands from all spectrums, and we would just to learn more from other groups and follow their lead a bit. Right now, we’re a great 30 minute band; but to put on a full 90 minute headlining set is a whole different beast. We want to learn under these smaller bands and create something special.

“On My Mind” from Beyond Bridges is available for pre-order now on iTunes, with a full release March 16th. For this and more, head to

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