America challenged Japan to a duel. A duel of machinery.

For American robotics company MegaBots and Japanese company Suidobashi it’s battle time. Punches will probably be thrown.   

In 2012, Suidobashi developed a giant robot called the Kuratas, which stands over 13 feet high and weighs just under 10,000 pounds. It can be manned by one person, and features a full heads-up display and an advanced targeting system, or can even be controlled remotely. Costing a bit over $1.35 million, the Kuratas was first revealed three years ago with no opposition in its field, making it the first ever robot of its kind.

Fast forward three years.

Only the most American of ideas conceivable would happen. MegaBots decided they would build their own giant robot, and challenge Suidobashi to a battle that was, until now, only a spark of imagination in our minds. The challenge went viral after being posted to YouTube and was soon seen by Suidobashi.

“We just finished tightening the bolts on the Mk. II, America’s first fully-functional, giant piloted robot,” the makers said in the video. “And because we’re American, we’ve added really big guns.”

After throwing in some details about the features of their robot, as well as details regarding the Kuratas, the team members did the inevitable.

“Suidobashi, we have a giant robot, you have a giant robot… You know what needs to happen,” after which the challenge was offered. America’s MegaBots picked a fight.

In Suidobashi’s response video, Kogoro Kurata, the company’s CEO, replied with several mocking retorts, such as “Come on guys, make it cooler. Just building something huge and sticking guns on it. It’s… Super American.”

Kurata goes on to say: “We can’t let another country win this. Giant robots are Japanese culture.”

The video ends with a message telling MegaBots to arrange the duel, and that Suidobashi will be there. But in order for it to be a real duel, the robots need to have some form of malee combat. The battle is expected to take place sometime in the summer or fall or 2016.

Now, while this may sound like an aggressively playful jab between giant robot companies, many predictions have begun circulating around regarding just what, exactly, this means for the future of giant fighting robots.

Until now, the only field in which robotic technology has received major attention has been in the medical field, which almost creates a comedic tone of irony. Medical robotics have been designed and intended to help people who are in the hospital, and now these two companies are in an arms race to design robots that could easily hospitalize people, in what has become one of the biggest public relations events in the history of robotic technology, especially considering how well-accepted and spread around it has been by social media.

MegaBots speculations suggest giant robots fighting could become the next huge worldwide sport, which, much like UFC or WWE, would be filled with an enthusiastic sense of danger and excitement, minus the actual injury of humans.

Giant robots would also have different limitations than what humans can, causing the style of the fights to be vastly different from traditional fighting-related sports. Robots can fire projectiles from their arms, withstand explosions, be loaded up with a wide array of equipment, and can be reassembled after being destroyed – or, at least, another one can be made to look like the first.

Much like Kurata said in Suidobashi’s response video, the fascination with giant robots fighting one another originated in Japanese culture, most noticeably in manga and anime. One of the most famous of all being the Gundam series, which is easily recognizable by anime fans worldwide for its giant robots (more commonly referred to as ‘mechs’) that fight each other with a mixture of sword fights and gun battles.

Some anime fans may remember a show from year back called IGPX, or, “Immortal Grand Prix” where giant mechs would race along long and convoluted tracks to a finish line, while fighting against an opposing team that would try and get there first.

Looking at the current models for the Mk. II and the Kuratas, both robots have armor, wheels and weaponry, meaning that to see them fighting and racing is, by no means, out of the questions. It goes without saying that, even if their dispute is only aimed at the purpose of entertainment, MegaBots and Suidobashi may be making history as the pioneers of what could be the next biggest sports in world history.