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Big Names, rising stars, total country at Bands in the Backyard

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For Southern Colorado, June brings promise of a big summer party. One of beer, grills, truck beds and lots of country music.

Bands in the Backyard, happening June 16-17, is back for another year in Vineland. Complete with food vendors, fun activities, camping and an amazing musical lineup, this is a must stop for any true country music fan. With a different lineup every year and a growing attendance since 2013, BITB is set to be bigger than ever this time around.

BITB strives hard to keep bringing big-name country artist to Colorado. Previous years lineups included household artists, such as Kid Rock and Toby Keith.

This year’s lineup is stacked with rising talent from the country music world. Headliners include Billy Currington and Thomas Rhett.

It’s worth noting that beyond the lineup the festival has been taking feedback seriously from previous events and has improved the ticketing system for this year and promises shorter wait times upon entering the festival.

Ticketing options are as follows, Friday single day ticket $70, Saturday single day ticket $80, two-day general admission ticket $125 and $140 for the premiere parking pass. Military discounts and upgrades to VIP are also available.

Friday

The lineup kicks off on Friday with an opening performance by Sonny Mackenzi at 4:30 p.m.  Fresh off the release of her latest single, “New Crush” a light hearted ode to first loves.

Following up with a 5:00 p.m. performance is Farewell Angelina, a talented four-member group of female singers. Named one of Rolling Stones “10 New Country Artists You Need To Know” in 2016, Farewell Angelina is riding a high into 2017.  Rounding out the night with a bit more Colorado flavor, Kory Brunson Band (KBB) hits the stage at 6:30 p.m. Hailing right here from our beautiful state. KBB’s debut album “Hard Country” has been well-received and produced two top 100 singles in “Girls Night Out” and “We Know You’re Out There.”

Then, the big party is set to start. Old Dominion will hit the stage, bringing along huge records like

“Break Up With Him” and “Snapback.” Currently riding a wave of success from their well-executed debut album, Meat and Candy, Old Dominion is quickly becoming one of the fastest rising country acts in the country. Topping off Old Dominion, Billy Currington serves as the headlining act for Friday’s musical lineup. A fan favorite all around, Currington is the source of a slew of number one hits like “People are Crazy” and “Good Directions.” With a ton of hits under his belt and a soulful charm that everyone seems to love, it’s set to be a great end to the night.

Saturday

Saturdays lineup, which begins at 3:30 p.m., is no disappointment either.  Chris Hawkeye, a veteran in the country music scene who has just recently seen a second life in his career, will start the day.

Following the release of his latest album, Shine, on November 18, 2016, Hawkeye is heading in to 2017 with a full head of steam behind the melodic lead single “Good Liar.”

Next out is the high energy aesthetic of Tim Montana and The Shrednecks. Sure to bring along their pot themed country music anthem, “Weed and Whiskey” Tim Montana and the Shrednecks fit too perfectly with Colorado’s legal marijuana laws and love of whiskey.

Jackson Michelson finds his way to the stage around 6:30 p.m. for an intimate show with the rising star. After years of touring and opening for other artists, Michelson has finally secured a record deal himself and has set the stage for a bigger year than ever before.  While still relatively new in the eyes of the world, Michaelson has a ton of support to gain in playing for a huge festival like this one.

Kane Brown hits the stage towards the end of the second night at 8:00 p.m., bringing along his quality song writing ability and good looking charm. The young artist first found fame through Internet success— quickly amassing a large following and transferring the results to a growing live fan base.  

Brown has found a ton of success in releasing his debut EP, Chapter One, and will capitalize on that success with a bigger year than ever in 2017.

The festivities end with a 10:00 p.m performance by Thomas Rhett, a household name in the world of country music. Still touring off of the the success of his 2015 album Tangled Up, a progressive work of art that finds Rhett at the best he’s ever been. You won’t want to miss performances of hit’s like “Crash and Burn” or “Die A Happy Man.”  Rhett, who has played Bands in the Backyard before, is a fantastic way to cap of the weekend full of country music and partying that is already looking like another year of success for the Vineland festival.

 

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Arts & Culture

Her Paris

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When we open an art history book or go to a major art museum, male artists dominate the narrative. A woman may be represented here and there, but the overall impression given is that women were negligible players in the history of art, outliers and curiosities.

In fact, nothing could be further from the truth, especially in 19th-century Paris. From the French Revolution on, women were a major presence on the Parisian art scene. They may not have been allowed into l’Ecole des Beaux-Arts, France’s largest art school, until 1897, but they were allowed to exhibit in the Paris Salon, Europe’s preeminent art exhibition–and did, in great numbers. Women studied art under private tutors or at smaller art academies like the Académie Julian, all while pushing for greater equality in the art world and, by extension, society as a whole. They were also major contributors to independent exhibitions, including those of the French Impressionists.

Her Paris goes a long way toward bringing more attention to these “forgotten” artists with an exhibit devoted entirely to women painters from the latter half of the 19th century. This huge exhibition is divided into seven sections covering portraiture, genre scenes, fashion, childhood, landscape, history painting, and “jeunes filles,” or young women.

The exhibit opens with portraiture, which seems a straightforward subject. But this section is more than just a series of portraits. It’s the perfect way to start the conversation about female artists in Paris because it demonstrates they weren’t a negligible presence on the Parisian art scene: they were part of an entire community. They were friends, sisters, roommates, neighbors, and rivals who lived, studied, socialized, and worked together to gain recognition for their artistic talents–not just individually, but as a group. From Berthe Morisot and her sister, Edna; once-famous Marie Bashkirtseff and the only person she considered her artistic equal, Louise Breslau; to Anna Elizabeth Klumpke, an American painter who was friends with Rosa Bonheur and later wrote her biography. These portraits show that women artists didn’t just come to Paris because it was the epicenter of European art; they came because in Paris they could find encouragement and support amongst other women.


The next section of Her Paris continues that theme, with scenes from everyday life, also known as genre. The theme may seem innocuous at first, until one looks closer. Between moments of eating dinner and pouring tea are women smoking (scandalous!), reading–which for a woman at the time was still a revolutionary act, underscoring they were human beings with an intellect and interior “life of the mind,” as the exhibition puts it–and performing the commonplace tasks and chores that formed the underpinning of Parisian society.

The grandest painting in this section is Lunch in the Greenhouse by Louise Abbéma, which dominates the wall at the far end of the gallery. When it was first exhibited in public, it was criticized for being “flat” and “emotionless.” But its rich color and high level of detail make it nearly irresistible: you feel like you can step right into the piece and sit down at the table.

There’s also a very modern rejection of narrative or moralizing in Lunch in the Greenhouse; it’s merely a snapshot of a moment, although Abbéma couldn’t resist adding the charm of the little girl with the big pink bow or the dog beside her. The other figures are friends and family of Abbéma, most notably the famous actress Sarah Bernhardt, with whom Abbéma is rumored to have had an affair. If true that makes Abbéma’s expression in the painting as she reclines behind Bernhardt all the more intriguing.

Abbéma also painted one of the stand-out pieces in the next section, devoted to fashion. Among the Flowers shows a woman in a gorgeous flower-printed white dress, whose form is mirrored by the black urn overflowing with flowers beside her. Abbéma’s association of a woman with a decorative object (indeed, the woman seems to be greeting the plant as if it were a person) sums up the theme of this section: that by focusing on fashion, these female artists weren’t just conflating fashion with art, but rejecting the idea that decoration of themselves and their homes should be their only creative outlet.

The next section focuses on paintings of children. While the idea that women artists are innately better able to depict children is patently stupid (men had been doing it perfectly well since the Renaissance), it can perhaps be said that women had greater access to child models. In fact, female artists of the 19th century usually used friends and family as models exclusively, since models for hire tended to have unsavory backgrounds (cough prostitutes cough).

The childhood section introduces the most unique artist by far included in Her Paris, German painter Paula Mendersohn-Becker. One of the earliest expressionist painters, Mendersohn-Becker is frequently referred to as the first female modernist and with good reason. Her paintings look like something out of the 1930s rather than the 19th century. Becker’s figures are flatly modeled, with a limited palette and expressive facial features. Far from pretty, there’s no denying the irresistible charm of Becker’s work in her use of line and her focus on the emotions, rather than the appearance, of her sitters.

The landscape section serves as the lynchpin of the whole exhibition because it’s here where you can really see how 19th-century women were pushing painting forward in new directions.

One of the most unique pieces is Waterfall by Fanny Churberg, which was described as abnormal and “strange” by contemporaries. It is unusual, but in an intriguing way. Churberg’s painting is highly naturalistic and textured, almost as if one is looking at it through a stereoscope (a way to combine two images into one to create a 3D effect). Anna Bilińska-Bohdanowicz’s atmospheric Unter den Linden in Berlin is another standout piece, as is Helen Schjerfbeck’s The Door, which captures a church door in Brittany. It’s a landscape, but could just as easily be called a still life, one that uses light and color to suggest a spiritual and symbolic component.

The last two sections of Her Paris–history painting and jeunes filles–are not as tightly themed as the previous sections, although they contain some of the exhibition’s best pieces. One of these is Plowing in the Nivernais by Rosa Bonheur, by far the most famous female painter of the 19th century, or any century before it. A child prodigy, she was the first woman to be awarded the Legion d’Honneur, France’s highest artistic award, which the Empress Eugenie herself pinned to Bonheur’s breast at her chateau outside of Paris.

Plowing in the Nivernais is one of Bonheur’s most well-known works, painted just after the 1848 Revolution that instituted the Second Republic. The stars of the painting are the Nivernais oxen clomping across the canvas, rendered in exquisite and loving detail. But Plowing in the Nivernais doesn’t just demonstrate Bonheur’s skill as an animal painter: her treatment of the soil, atmosphere, and sunlight is the height of realism. You can almost feel the heat of the sun, smell the turned earth, and feel the soft ground beneath your feet. Indeed, the very solidity of the oxen and landscape conveys a sense of permanence and on the grand scale of a history painting. Bonheur may not have been painting history as such, but she was undoubtedly commenting on the endurance of France, despite the ups and downs of political changes.

Other artists of note include Anna Archer, whose paintings are quiet, yet luminous; Eva Gonzalès, the only pupil of Edouard Manet, who has several charming pieces; Marianne Stokes, with gorgeously rich canvases inspired by the Pre-Raphaelites; and Julie Delance-Feurgard, whose Le marriage exudes an intense feeling of movement and suspense, despite the rather staid subject matter.

Her Paris is an extraordinary exhibition that introduces art lovers to the best painters they’ve never heard of. The sheer volume of work in this exhibit is staggering, especially when one considers it covers just 35 female painters who trod Paris’ cobblestoned streets for a mere fifty years. Her Paris, along with The Women of Abstract Expressionism that took place earlier this year, marks the DAM as an institutional leader and innovator. This show is definitely not one to be missed.

Her Paris: Women Artists in the Age of Impressionism will be on view through January 14th, 2018. Advanced tickets are highly recommended. For more information, visit denverartmuseum.org.

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Walsenburg’s Museum of Friends, The Improbable Gallery turns 10

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The small, working-class town of Walsenburg, Colorado, seems an unlikely location for a top-notch contemporary art museum crammed with works by over 600 important and influential artists. But the charming Museum of Friends is just such a place, a hidden gem on Walsenburg’s main drag that’s a must-visit for anyone with an interest in the arts.

Many of the best museums in the world–the British Museum, the Borghese Gallery, the Freer Gallery of Art at the Smithsonian, and the Hermitage in St. Petersburg, just to name a few–started out as personal collections, and the Museum of Friends is no different. Co-founders Brendt Berger and Maria Cocchiarelli-Berger call their museum the Museum of Friends because it consists of pieces given to them or the museum by fellow artists. Berger and Cocchiarelli have lived all over the country, from Maine to Hawaii, and their collection reflects the diversity of their friends, acquaintances, and experiences, accumulated over the course of 50-odd years working in the arts.

Many of the artists represented at the Museum of Friends were active in the numerous “hippie” communes that popped up all over Southern Colorado in the 1960s and ’70s. That’s no coincidence: Berger visited Drop City, the first rural commune in the US, in the 1960s and participated briefly in its offshoot, Libre, near Gardner. Sketches, photos, and paintings of the communes’ signature geodesic domes are scattered throughout the second-floor gallery. The fact that so many pieces in the Museum document the artistic styles and movements coming out of these communes makes the Museum of Friends the first and only museum of the countercultural movement in the U.S.

But you don’t have to be into counterculture to enjoy a visit to the Museum of Friends! There’s truly something for everyone, from luminous watercolors to vintage posters, color field paintings to collages, lithographic prints and drawings, artifacts from the South Pacific and Asia, found art sculptures, and even an art library. The collection includes Guggenheim Fellows, National Medal of Arts recipients, reality TV stars (Peregrine Honig from Bravo’s Work of Art: Search for the Next Great Artist), naturalists, abstractionists, expressionists, surrealists, and artists who don’t fall into any –ism at all. You might recognize pieces by Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, Christo, Denver native Dennis Oppenheim, Linda Fleming, and NYT cartoonist Richard Mock. But there’s an even greater chance you’ll fall in love with an artist whose work you’ve never seen before.

That’s because the Museum of Friends’ focus isn’t on big names or price points, but interconnection. Every piece in the collection has a story attached to it, and Berger and Cocchiarelli are more than happy to share those memories with visitors on guided tours. It’s those links and personal relationships that make the Museum of Friends special, underscoring the true power of art: its ability to form connections between people and create a sense of community.

“Art is so heavily focused on monetary value today,” Berger told us. “That’s why you see the same artists over and over in exhibitions, no matter where you go in the world. We wanted to bypass that and take money out of the equation. Everything here is given or traded by people who put their lives on the line to create art. It’s about what art really is, a passion and a labor of love.”

The Museum’s philosophy of openness and fostering community extends to its entrance fee–donation only–and its outreach programs, like the colorful painted planters you can see along Walsenburg’s Main and 6th Streets. The Museum also exhibits local artists. Currently on view are Pueblo painter Bobby Valentine and aerial photographer John Wark, as well as Cocchiarelli herself, who’s showing a collection of “mini” paintings along with mini collages by Matt Gonzalez and mini abstract watercolors by Harry Tsuchidana.

While Walsenburg may seem an improbable place for a contemporary art museum, after almost a decade the Museum of Friends is going strong. Berger and Cocchiarelli will celebrate the Museum’s tenth anniversary on October 19th, and have secured grants to renovate the 100-year-old historic building for structural integrity and easier access to the second floor.

Art can mean many things to many people, but it’s the personal stories and connections that bring a photo or drawing or canvas to life. That’s exactly what makes the Museum of Friends such a positive experience: the sense of learning, community, and friendship that infuses the whole museum and makes it a must-see for art lovers of every stripe.

Bobby Valentine: Magical Paintings and John Wark: Aerial Photographs will be on view at the Museum of Friends’ ground floor through October 28, 2017. Minis will be up on the second floor through September 30th. For more information, visit www.museumoffriends.org.

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Colorado

For the Love of Westcliffe, in Photos

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I absolutely love Westcliffe.

I love the people. I love the quiet, small town setting of the Sangre de Cristos. I love the wildness of mountains. I love that it’s still considered “a secret” in this state.

I love the Mennonite bakery with their butter cookies and cinnamon rolls. I love that there is a bowling alley with average food but the most reliable restaurant hours in town. I love the little supermarket and how the cashiers will chat with locals about how they can’t wait til the busy season is over. I love that it’s considered one of the best places in the world to see the stars.

I love (and have to laugh at) the culture here that simultaneously needs and despises tourists. The barely under the surface sense of, “we don’t want things to ever change, so please don’t move here” attitude that most residents and business owners have. And I don’t blame them one bit.   

I love the type of people this place attracts: the pioneers, the fierce independents, the homesteaders & DIYers, the “I’ll figure that out” crowd. Those who don’t want a manicured lawn and cookie cutter home and life.

Most everyone that I know here is fine with friends stopping over for an unplanned meal. I love the church we’ve attended. I love that the people here take care of each other. I love our friends here. They’re like family. I really love that to get anywhere in civilization you have to drive 2+ hours.

I seriously love this place.

I love the mountains. The aspen groves. The pine trees. The endless hiking trails. The peaks. The high mountain lakes. The summers and the winters. And the spring and fall, though those seasons are the shortest. I love the wildflowers. I love the afternoon thunderstorms in the summers. I love the feel and smell when summer starts to fade and autumn is beginning. The aspens start changing and for a few short weeks, the mountainside appears to be on fire.

I love running the Instagram account @WestcliffeColorado because I get to know the creative people who love this place too. I’ve learned that it’s very easy to showcase the best parts about Westcliffe, especially online in a quick snapshot. But in reality, the heart of the town is not only pretty pictures of mountains and pine trees in nice matching squares online.

It’s a town full of hard working people who are extremely passionate about their freedom to live a simple life.

If you want to learn high altitude gardening, how to preserve food, knit, quilt, build a house, build a car, forage in the wilderness, hunt, fish, shear an alpaca and spin the wool, cook,  or live off the grid, this place is crawling with folks who could definitely survive the end of the world just fine.

If you’re looking for a weekend away from the fast-paced constant movement of the city, without the tourism of Breckenridge, Westcliffe might be a good fit for you. Whether it’s hiking up to South Colony Lakes and camping out under the stars after cooking some fish or staying at a bed and breakfast downtown, there is definitely a special charm to this small town.

Westcliffe is full of residents who are eager to preserve its solitude and isolation. So, if you decide to come visit for the weekend, try to find it within yourself to appreciate the occasional cold shoulder and slow-paced culture around town as well as the rugged beauty evident everywhere. The wildness and simplicity of this place will make your soul come alive.

by Hannah Corson, special to PULP

Hannah Corson created and helps moderate the @WestcliffeColorado Instagram account, which features photos from locals and visitors to the region.


Hermit Pass is directly West of town and is one of the tallest passes in the state. If you enjoy four wheel trails with a view this is a great spot to visit! Thats a wrap for me moderating this week, thanks for all the support! We'll be visiting the area in a couple weeks to shoot lots of time-lapse photography so if you see us out and about say hello! – @elemotionphoto Image by: @stephcoffmanphoto Selected by: @elemotionphoto · · · #westcliffecolorado #SummerInTheSangres #coloradotography #offroad #landscapephotography #sunset #mountains #adventureculture #coloradocameraclub #discoverearth #exploretocreate #getoutside #ig_mountains #keepitwild #mountainlife #natgeotravel #travelcolorado #visualsoflife #instagood

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Question for all you Colorado locals & natives: what is your favorite hike in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains? If you want to have some new hiking adventures this summer then tag yourself and a friend, we'll compile a list of the top 5, then tag you in a post telling you the best hikes to try out! Tag your Westcliffe adventures: @westcliffecolorado, #summerinthesangres Image: Dena Smith Woods Selected by: @hannahcorson • • • • • #Westcliffecolorado #visitcolorado #coloradotography #colorfulcolorado #coloradountamed #travelcolorado #optoutside #livethemountainlife #choosemountains #rural_love #photographyislifee #mountainsarecalling #landscape #photoaday #huffpostgram #coloradocollective #coloradophotographers #coloradoinstagram #colorfulcolorado #summerhiking #coloradohikes #hikingislife #14ers #rockymountains #sangredecristomountains #denver #coloradosprings #salidacolorado #pueblocolorado #adventureisouthere

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