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Yeezus, Kanye West | Album Review

Yeezus [Explicit]

Def Jam Recordings

It’s not unique to hear Kanye West try something new and he’s continuing to try new things. A new found motivation and a new found anger is unleashed on this album. The tracks were consistent with energy-filled vocals from West and the lyrics keep you trying to decipher its meaning.

With tracks like “I Am God” and “New Slaves”, it makes you wonder what kind of statement Kanye is trying to make about his presence in the rap game and the true intentions of the music industry. Despite the fact that Kanye is trying to come off as different, the album tended to have an eerie and abrupt impact on you.

Though the album had some good tracks, the overall album was far from great. There was an over usage of auto-tune and some of the rhyming wasn’t on par with the hype that was created for this album. Kanye came out and said this was going to be his best album yet, but he failed, yet again, to surpass the quality of content he was able to put together for The College Dropout.

There is a round of applause in store for the production on this album. Kanye crafted together an awesome blend of samples and seamless transitions throughout the CD. During two spots of the album, Kanye made abrupt changes in the track in order to portray his split-personality and it definitely felt that way as the track switched tempo in the middle of the chorus.

Yeezus, it wasn’t great but it was good and better than a lot of the Hip-Hop albums that have been released during the last year.

— by Felix Cordova

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Written by Felix Cordova

From growing up in the East Side of Pueblo, to graduating from CSU-Pueblo, Felix has been on a journey to tell the most interesting stories of the world. As experience is gained, stories get better.

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